Elements of a Good Facebook Graphic

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Elements of a Good Facebook Graphic

I have been recommending Info-Graphics and Professional Graphics to my clients and this one from “The Bean Cast” is a great example.Bob Norpp

  • Note the “interesting graphic” with color and images that “pop” and get your attention.
  • See the company logo
  • The picture of Bob Norpp the Bean Cast Host
  • The easy to read name “Bean Cast”
  • The Brand explained “marketing podcast.

These are all components of a good graphic you might post on social media.

 

Let me know if you are using graphic images to attract more attention on your social media sites.


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Can your Smart phone serve as your PC?

I saw this on “the Next Web Apps” RSS Feed and thought it was worth sharing.

What if you could run around town with your Android phone using it like you normally do and when you get to the office all you have to do is dock it and start your day? That’s exactly what Ubuntu wants to do with its pitch to Android handset manufacturers to embed the operating system into its devices.

Ubuntu for Android
is a full-featured operating system for desktop computing and all you would have to do is dock your phone to use it.

In addition to a desktop operating system, all of the functionality from the phone would be available to you at the click of a mouse. If your phone gets a call or text message, it would pop up on the external monitor you’ve set up to use it. As we noted yesterday, Apple is taking a unification approach to its mobile and desktop operating systems, and this Ubuntu solution would be even better since it doesn’t require two devices:

Dallas Mobile App Strategist J.R. Atkins comments on Ubuntu for Android 

While the operating system isn’t available right now, Ubuntu wants to get consumers excited about it so the pitch to handset creators will go that much smoother for it. Ubuntu states that a desktop environment hosted only on the web on devices such as netbooks haven’t gone over well with consumers since the desktop requires horsepower and storage for optimal productivity.

The approach makes total sense and I could see Android handsets jumping on this bandwagon. One device that provides multiple functions, especially business functions, could become extremely attractive to IT professionals who are looking to control the costs within their organization. Instead of providing each employee with a desktop machine and a mobile device, all they’d have to do is provide them with a phone. Since employees would only be using one device, there would be less security concerns as well as issues with syncing things like calendars and contact information.

As mobile phones get more computing power, the one device approach is becoming a reality and it’s one that I’d be interesting in giving a try. Even though Google does a great job at syncing information, I’d much rather only have to worry about having one device that could replace my laptop with nothing more than a few peripherals that I can leave behind when I’m on the road.

There’s no time-frame for when we could see Android handsets with this capability but if the company can prove that consumers want something like this, it’s a no-brainer for handset manufacturers.

See the original article “the Next Web Apps”


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Helsinki’s Urbanflow; an Intersection of Technology, Transparency and Helpfulness

I find it very interesting where Mobile Apps, Events, Services, Art and Transportation intersect. There is a great article and video on the Fast Company Micro Site called CO.EXIST about Helsinki “Urban flow: A City’s Information, Visualized in Real Time – Combining a map, tourist information, and data about the city’s services, a new system is making Helsinki truly transparent.” Here is the text content, make sure you check out the video. It’s about 5 minutes but worth it if you like this topic.

“According to Adam Greenfield, most public information systems aren’t very useful. He reckons a lot of kiosks you see in stations, plazas, and on sidewalks are expensive white elephants: a nice idea in some official’s mind, but not something that real people want to actually delve into on a consistent basis.

“Our research suggests that the overwhelming majority of these remain woefully underutilized, resulting in virtually no return on the significant investment involved in installing and maintaining them,” he says, referring to his New York urban systems design practice, Urbanscale.

Greenfield’s firm has teamed up with another in Helsinki, called Nordkapp, to develop something better. The result is what they call Urbanflow, an information system that both tourists and local people might actually want to use.

Urbanflow provides layers of data: a way-finder allowing people to map A to B and find out about local services, and a mass of “ambient” city data on air quality, traffic density, parking, cycling, and public transport. Urbanflow is two-way: Users glean information, but also feed it back, for example reporting on, say, faulty streetlights or vandalism.

Sami Niemelä, Nordkapp’s creative director, says the system is not only designed to be useful, but also “playful,” encouraging people to use it. He also wants to change behavior, making people more aware of their environment.

“We’re making the city more transparent to its people, displaying data and making people care more,” he says. “I believe when you make the information more transparent it affects people’s behavior.”

Helsinki, a city of about 590,000 people, currently has 20 non-interactive urban screens used mostly for advertising. The new system will probably become available later this year, on one side of the same terminal. Urbanscale is developing a variant of Urbanflow for Chicago.”

 

Urbanflow Helsinki from Nordkapp on Vimeo.


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