The BeanCast talks about Mobile

The BeanCast talks about Mobile

Author J.R. Atkins recommends Bob Knorpp and the BeanCastMeet my friend Bob Knorpp. Bob produces a podcast that is recorded on Sunday nights and released every Monday covering current topics in Marketing, Advertising, Sales, Technology, New Media, Design … you get it, all the cool and fun things. In episode 211 “Everyone else is Lying” you will hear some discussion on Mobile Apps that I hope you find interesting and informative. Click on the link below, listen and let me know what you think.

http://beancast.evanbooth.com/shows/0211_The_BeanCast_Marketing_Podcast_Everyone_Else_Is_Lying.mp3

GUESTS

Dallas Speaker J.R. Atkins likes the BeanCast


Why do Time, Money & Relationships matter?

Consultant J.R. Atkins discusses time, money and relationshipsVery simply, these are the only three things that matter. I assert that all other issues, goals, solutions, answers …can be boiled down to one of these three. Let’s go through each one and see.

Time is often considered the most valuable commodity. After all, you can get more money, love, people, cars, books …but you cannot get more time. The closest thing to getting more time is to leverage your time or other people’s time. Time is the first commodity we are given to manage. As a young salesman with E&J Gallo Winery, I was taught to manage my time first, then I could manage others, and this held true.

“Too often, when we have money, we don’t have time and when we have time, we don’t have money.” Jim Rohn

Professional Speaker J.R. Atkins address money, time & relationshipsMoney is held in high regard in most of the world. It represents power, accomplishment, wealth, knowledge, wisdom, and even love is often expressed in the form of money or gifts. With money, you can do almost anything. Without money, there are so many obstacles to overcome that most people cannot do anything without money. When I consider the issues I face in life; most of them would either go away or be less important with the addition of more money. Not all problems can be solved by money which brings us to people or relationships.

Money is not the root of evil; “the love of money is the root of evil.” 1 Tim 6:10

Relationships affect us in both our work and personal lives. I have heard many people joke that their life would be so easy without these darn people messing it up. While comical, it is also true. We are made to be in relationship with each other, some more Author J.R. Atkins points out that Relationships Matterso than others, and relationships create issues. As leaders, we are asked to get people moving, creating results. As workers we are asked to follow our leaders and get things done. It is a two way street. Gone are the days where one person orders and the other person complies. We all have to work together, get along, collaborate, avoid confrontation … to generate results and keep the peace.

“And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love” 1 Cor 13:13

With these three “commodities” addressed, let’s look at an example of Starting a Business.  To start a business you need all three: time, money and relationships. For example, I connect with many people wanting to build a mobile application for smart Author, Speaker & Consultant J.R. Atkins is a member of Startup Americaphones. Most have little or no money so they put in time and strive to find others that will contribute their money, in exchange for future earnings. Relationships are key in this environment as the entrepreneur must interact with people in order to get them to support his/her idea. They must attract talent, investors, customers, mentors … and all of these require some level of time, money and relationships. Can you think of an issue an entrepreneur might face that cannot be addressed by these three?

The model below represents a “Balanced Approach” where time, money and relationships are seen as equals. Yet, most of the entrepreneurs I speak with would rather have more money and less time and relationships since they can “buy” time and relationships with money. I call this “A Money Centric Approach.” Without enough money, even with plenty of time and relationships, the road to success is very, very steep.

Consultant J.R. Atkins comments on the intersection of time, money & relationships 

How do these concepts and ideas fit into your world view? Do you have an idea of your “hourly billable rate?” Claiming an hourly rate that you desire will help you choose what task you will do and what task you will hire others to complete. Your hourly rate will also help you compute the dollar value of your participation in a project or business.

I look forward to reading your comments, please post them at http://somethingdifferentcompanies.com/blog/

 Events Worth Considering:


Is Your Mobile phone Making You More or Less Productive?

We often hear about the ways our Mobile phone can help us become more productive with on-the go solutions like Mobile Website, Mobile Apps, email, push notifications, Geo-fencing, Meet Me Apps, …But could you be less productive as well? Do we let the technology run us sometimes instead of us running the technology?

Mobile App Consultant J.R. Atkins comments on Smartphone useNdubuisi Ekekwe is a founder of the non-profit African Institution of Technology and posted the below article in the Harvard Business Review. Please add your comments below the article.

Mobile devices have exacerbated an always-on work culture where employees work anytime, anywhere. They’ve contributed to the blurred distinction between when you’re “on the clock” and when you’re not. Service industry professionals are especially tethered to these devices. There’s an assumption that using smart devices boosts productivity, since they allow us to work constantly. But, we’re also jeopardizing long-term productivity by eliminating predictable time off that ensures balance in our lives. Is the obsession of regularly checking email really helping anyone’s bottom line? Are the unrealistic expectations these devices facilitate not setting staff up for burnout?

From my experience, this hyper-connectivity carries a cost to organizational productivity. Many months ago, in my Africa-based startup, my top managers decided to adopt a business engagement process where customers and staff could reach them 24/7. There was a perception that if a customer or a colleague needed something and couldn’t get it immediately, the firm would not be taken seriously. The staff was under intense pressure to be available whenever anyone called — it was simply expected. Six months later, we noticed that customer complaints were actually up, and team morale was down.

So, why were we spoiling dinner time for each other with calls that could have waited until the next business day?

In a forthcoming book, “Sleeping with Your Smartphone: How to Break the 24-7 Habit and Change the Way You Work,” Harvard Business School professor Leslie Perlow provides insights on this fraught relationship with smart devices. In an experiment that focused on mandating time off for consultants for at least one night per week, she noticed that — over time — their work lives improved, and they were largely more productive. For the research subjects who followed her policy of disconnecting from work at night, 78% said that they “feel satisfied” with their jobs, compared to the group of people who ignored the policy, where only 49% noted the same sense of satisfaction. Her results show that we’re creating a self-perpetuating perception that working faster is better — even when speed may not be necessary.

The reality is that business processes have been changed by technology. Competition is now global and companies need to act fast to survive. Accordingly, we have institutionalized a system where customers and staff expect everyone to be always-connected. And with that, 24/7 speed has become a key performance metric. The impetus to examine whether what we do requires 24/7 responsiveness is overlooked. We all work longer and harder, despite the possibility that we could work better. But since everyone is doing it, it’s considered acceptable.

But, here’s the thing: Business will not collapse if we don’t respond to e-mail at 11 PM. Waiting until 9 AM has plenty of benefits that arguably outweigh the benefits of speed, such as giving ourselves an opportunity to think through the problem and provide a better idea that customers will appreciate. Instead of acquiescing to the knee-jerk reflex of responding to every incoming message, we should put these devices in their place — that is, to serve us, and not the other way around.

Companies need to help employees unplug. (Of course, every business is unique, and must take its own processes into consideration. But for most companies, giving employees predictable time off will not hurt the bottom line.) In my own firm, when we noticed that always-on was not producing better results, we phased it out of our culture. A policy was instituted that encouraged everyone to respect time off, and discouraged people from sending unnecessary emails and making distracting calls after hours. It’s a system that works if all of the team members commit to it. Over time, we’ve seen a more motivated team that comes to work ready for business, and goes home to get rejuvenated. They work smarter, not blindly faster. And morale is higher.

Give it a try in your own company. As a trial, talk to your team and agree to shutdown tonight. I’m confident that you’ll all feel the benefits in the morning.

Link to orginal article.


Could Airships Return to Service

Dallas Social Media Strategist J.R. Atkins wriest about The new Hybrid AirshipI remember begin a kid and driving by the Good Year Blimp hangar in Conroe Texas, on our way to Houston. Sometime we would stop if it was taking off or landing to watch its graceful movements. But I have not seen a Blimp or Airship for many years now, yet they may return to service before long. There have been many changes in materials, technology and the transportation industry that may make Hybrid Airship usage viable again.

New Airships use hovercraft technology to raise and lower themselves somewhat like a helicopter. The shape is more wing-like and aerodynamic then the older models such as the famous Hindenburg. The skin of the new Airships will be made of tough new fabric that can last up to 15 years and the hull is pressure stabilized so if you poked it with a sharp object all
the helium inside would not rush out.

Dallas Mobile App Consultant J.R. Atkins comments on Sky Scraper Airship portSince Airships do not need a long runway, Airship Ports can be set up adjacent to a large parking lot. Can you imagine a portion of the Wal-Mart parking lot being cordoned off for an Airship landing and takeoff? Think how this would open up additional markets. Instead of going to the traditional airport, you can go to a regional Airship Port to catch your next flight. This could help elevate some of the crowding at traditional airports.

Although the weight capacity is similar to airplanes, the fuel consumption of an Airship is much less. Think about it, once an Airship is airborne, it takes little fuel to push it along. But this does bring up the issue of speed. The average Airship would have a top end speed of 120 mph making a trip from LA to New York take about 20 hours. So, maybe it’s better for
shorter hops or for non-rush cargo.

If you have time and would like a unique way to travel then keep your eye open for ads in the future. As for now, I was unable to find a source selling tickets on any type of airship. Yet we both know, if you have the money …

I look forward to reading your thoughts and comments on the future of Airships.

Sources & Resources:


iPad still #1 in Tablet Sales

The numbers are in for Q2 ’11 Tablet shipments and Apple is still#1 followed by Android, Microsoft and BlackBerry, according to the latest research from Strategy Analytics

Dallas social media speaker J.R. Atkins address Mobile Tablet sales for second q of 2011

According to the latest research from Strategy Analytics, global tablet shipments reached 15 million units in the second quarter of 2011. Apple maintained first position with 61 percent share, drifting from 94 percent a year earlier.

 

Peter King, Director at Strategy Analytics, said, “Global tablet shipments reached 15.1 million units in Q2 2011, surging 331 percent from 3.5 million in Q2 2010. Consumer and business demand for touchscreen computers remains high. Apple shipped a record 9.3 million iPads and registered a healthy 61 percent global tablet market share during the second quarter of 2011. However, Apple has drifted down from 94 percent share in Q2 2010 due to a rising number of competing software platforms.”

 

Neil Mawston, Director at Strategy Analytics, added, “Android captured 30 percent share of global tablet shipments in Q2 2011. Multiple Android models distributed across multiple countries by multiple brands such as Samsung, Acer, Asus, Motorola and others are driving volumes. However, no Android vendor yet offers a blockbuster model to rival the iPad, and demand for many Android vendors’ products remains patchy. If Amazon decides to enter the Android tablet category later this year, that will bring fresh excitement and buzz to the Android community, but Amazon will need to deliver a truly standout offering if it really wants to make headway against the popular iPad.”

 

Other findings from the research include:

• Microsoft captured a niche 5 percent global tablet share in Q2 2011, leveraging Windows 7 through partners such as Fujitsu;

• RIM and its QNX platform captured 3 percent global tablet share in Q2 2011. The first-generation PlayBook model experienced a lackluster launch due to product design issues surrounding native email support.

 

 

Read more: http://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/11/07/b1786786/strategy-analytics-apple-ios-captures-61-percent-share-of-global-tablet#ixzz1Sqj2cOBI

Original Post: http://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/11/07/b1786786/strategy-analytics-apple-ios-captures-61-percent-share-of-global-tablet

 


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